Tag Archives: Rodrigo Izquierdo

REVIEW: Puddles Pity Party Treats the Crowd Like Royals in Mesa (12-7-18)

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PHOENIX — Many of us have been invited to a pity party and more than likely, we have no desire to attend. When Puddles the sad clown hosts one, however, I recommend you RSVP and make it a priority on your calendar.

I was one such lucky attendee amidst several thousand others that packed the Ikeda Theater at Mesa Arts Center. Not knowing what to expect of the next 110 intermission-free minutes aside from a sweet serenade from the 6’8” baritone crooner in a clown costume, I kept my mind, ears, and eyes open.

Three minutes before the show was set to begin, the house lights were still up as people shuffled to their seats. There appeared to be commotion on the mezzanine level as several audience members looked up to see the unmistakable giant, cuddly clown making his way through the sea of people giving hugs, handshakes, and posing for photos. He effortlessly hurdled the chairs and made a concerted effort to greet as many of his party “guests” as he could, before making his way down to the ground level where he popped through the back doors and dashed to and fro, greeting attendees as he made his way up to the stage.

Puddles Pity Party - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Puddles Pity Party
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

Puddles Pity Party is anything but predictable, and after enthusiastically giving high fives to some of the folks in the front rows, he hoisted himself up onto the stage and awkwardly rolled to his feet despite the fact that there was an accessibility staircase not 10 feet to his left. It was at this moment I realized that things were going to be shaken up into a concoction of splendor and entertainment that would take all of us on a wild adventure of fellowship and laughter.

The festivities began with Puddles amusingly popping a whopping amount of gum into his mouth and loudly chewing as he read an AARP magazine featuring Kevin Costner.

Puddles Pity Party - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Puddles Pity Party
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

Much like other aspects of the show, these pieces may have seemed trivial at the time, but became integral parts of his act. Perpetually animated and childlike in his movement at times, Puddles — brought to life by Mike Geier — scoots about the stage on his stool and takes his sweet time getting to center stage to watch a montage of his trials and tribulations while appearing on America’s Got Talent. The sad clown with the golden voice sang his rendition of R.E.M.’s “Losing My Religion”, only to be abruptly stopped by a loud buzzer and a giant red X like the one he received while performing for the show. Despite this, Puddles pressed on.

Puddles Pity Party - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Puddles Pity Party
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

The irony was not lost in respect to a silent comic entertainer who uses only his vocal ability to belt out emotional tunes; however, the heartfelt depth of his singing left the partygoers absolutely stunned. Puddles performed “The Sound of Silence” to a video of ASL translator, Zoey Stormes, signing a moving performance. Though he is a sad clown who expresses tremendous variety of emotion, from melancholy, to gratitude, to wonderment, it’s virtually impossible to be sad while in his presence. Laughter and words of encouragement from the crowd consistently permeated the silence.

Puddles Pity Party - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Puddles Pity Party
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

Puddles has several obsessions that attendees learn throughout their time with him, two of which are Kevin Costner and coffee. Never have I attended a party that entailed a coffee break, but there is a first time for everything. In fact, Puddles Pity Party contained many firsts, which takes the Vaudevillian style act from being a show to a full-fledged experience. I lost count of how many times Puddles left his wad of gum behind on his suitcase of goodies and plucked it back up to resume chewing. Additionally, I lost count of how many times he rolled himself off the stage to interact with the audience and bring a new friend up to be a part of the show. Attendees were swept away, transformed into an environment where excitement is found in the simple and absurd.

It was when I oddly caught “the feels” from hilarious snippets of robots falling over to the sound of Puddles’ emotional rendition of Coldplay’s “Fix You” that I realized the power and magnitude of this king-sized clown’s voice. No love song directed at a cup of coffee will ever feel so pure and heartfelt as it did in that theater.

Partygoers were just as much a part of the show, and were brought into Puddles’ world of make-believe. One woman transformed into a wolf that Puddles waltzed with. A gentleman enthusiastically sang the karaoke version of “All By Myself”. Another got to be a rocket scientist, and yet another got to stuff his face with cupcakes while being reminded that the word “stressed” spelled backwards is “desserts”. Puddles even had one of the party attendees summon Kevin Costner, albeit after a failed attempt that accidentally summoned Kevin Bacon.

Puddles Pity Party - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Puddles Pity Party with concertgoer
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

Other celebrities were attending in spirit, as it was impossible to miss the homages to Axl Rose, Freddie Mercury, and the King himself, Elvis Presley. Puddles’ prowess as an accomplished musician was made apparent through performing on his cardboard guitar that asserts “Do Good Work”, to his various beats on both real and video game drum sets, to his unique song mashups.

Geier, affectionately known as “Big Mike”, who has run a burlesque performance troupe out of Atlanta and also performs with the Kingsized Jazz Trio, has the performer gene coursing through his veins. Traveling with Puddles Pity Party, he has made audiences giggle and laugh warmly all over the world while wearing his endearing heart on his ruffled sleeve.

All you would have to do is go on YouTube and search “Puddles” to encounter countless videos of the sad clown with the golden voice. One of his most captivating being his rendition of Sia’s “Chandelier”, which partnered with Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox and also performed on America’s Got Talent to agape jaws and an uproarious standing ovation.

The party on Friday was no exception and the crowd had their phones out to record video of his most notable serenade, as is encouraged. This did not stop Puddles from giving his adoring fans the up-close and personal show they were hoping for, as he grabbed one phone to sing to it and place it in the hand of another individual while picking up their phone and passing it on until there were multitudes of attendees who had incredible footage of Puddles and the cell phone of their fellow party-goer. The laughter that ensued afterward while people scrambled to find each rightful owner was memorable. If anyone can bring people closer together with their fellow man, it’s most definitely Puddles the sad clown.

Puddles Pity Party - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Puddles Pity Party
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

If you have the opportunity to attend a pity party put on by Puddles, I highly encourage it. How a sad clown can make everyone in a room light up with laughter is a special kind of magic that can only be felt and seen by experiencing it firsthand.

Photo Album

Photographer: Rodrigo Izquierdo

Puddles Pity Party – Mesa Arts Center 12-7-18

Flickr Album Gallery Powered By: WP Frank

Photography © Reagle Photography
All Rights Reserved

REVIEW: No Throw-Aways With Garbage at Marquee Theatre (10-7-18)

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Tempe, AZ — On Sunday night, Garbage played at the Marquee Theatre as part of the “20 Years Paranoid” tour celebrating the 20th anniversary of the release of their Version 2.0 album. Opening for them was Rituals of Mine, a Los Angeles-based duo previously known as Sister Crayon.

At the start of the show, it wasn’t clear that Ritual of Mine’s self-described electronic/downtempo R&B sound would appeal to the packed house of late-to-middle-age Gen Xers. But as Terra Lopez sang “To Show You Violence,” the mood in the theater shifted from one of silent, reserved judgement to silent awe. Her indisputably powerful and clear voice resounded throughout the theatre to the applause of a crowd won over.

Rituals of Mine - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Rituals of Mine |
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

Rituals of Mine recently collaborated with Tricky and The Glitch Mob, and the duo is now working on their sophomore LP. They will also accompany Garbage throughout the entire U.S. anniversary tour. “This is a dream for us,” Lopez told the crowd. While Rituals of Mine isn’t a new act, the tour along with their recent collaborations could expose the group to a much wider audience.

Rituals of Mine - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Terra Lopez (Vocalist), Rituals of Mine |
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

It is a privilege to share our stage with them,” Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson said later during the show, “cause not all musicians are good people, you know what I’m saying?

When Garbage finally took the stage, they opened with “Afterglow,” followed by “Deadwood,” and “Temptation Waits”. To the delight of the audience, Depeche Mode’s “Personal Jesus” was mixed in midway through “Wicked Ways.” By the time “Special” began to play, the crowd was fully amped.

Garbage - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Garbage |
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

This is an incredible surprise for us… We never ever know what we’re getting, and it is always extraordinary and it’s fun,” a breathless Shirley Manson told the screaming crowd. “We’re here to celebrate a record that was immensely influential for us as people. It took us all over the world.

Version 2.0, the band’s sophomore album released in 1998, was immensely successful, quickly gaining Platinum status in the U.S. and selling more than four million copies worldwide. It received two Grammy nominations, including “Album of the Year” and “Best Rock Album”. And in 1999, the single “Special,” was nominated for “Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocal”.

Garbage has often credited Version 2.0 with solidifying their place in 90s rock music. In June, they reissued a special edition of the album that included 10 B-sides, several of which they played during their show at the Marquee, including “Lick the Pavement” and their cover of Big Star’s “Thirteen.” The group also has plans to record a new album for release in 2019.

One of Garbage’s last visits to the Valley was during a show at the Arizona State Fair to promote Strange Little Birds. Maybe it was the venue — the Veterans Memorial Coliseum has seen better days — or maybe it was just the changing state of affairs in the world at that time, but Manson seemed drained, world-weary and even a little sad. They delivered a powerful performance, but you couldn’t help leaving with the impression that maybe they weren’t coming back.  

By contrast, Garbage was more alive than ever on stage at the Marquee. Manson seemed to have a renewed energy and vigor that made you forget you were singing along to songs that are now 20 years old.

Garbage - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Shirley Manson (Vocalist), Garbage |
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

During “Push It,” nearly the entire front of the house was jumping up and down with Manson and screaming the chorus. The stage was backlit with playful rainbow hues for “When I Grow Up.” Then, at the end of “Can’t Seem to Make You Mine,” Manson joined Duke Erikson at the keyboard to play glissandos back and forth across the keys.

Despite what they will tell you, this is not a celebration of nostalgia,” Manson told concert-goers early in the evening. “It is a moment in which to collect you all in one space and feed off that mental energy that you just provided for us.

But there was something undeniably nostalgic about the sound clips from familiar old movies interspersed between each song. Before “Hammering in My Head,” a clip of Rutger Hauer’s iconic monologue from the final scene of Bladerunner played: “I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe. … All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.” And before “Medication” they played a clip of HAL 9000 repeating: “Take a stress pill and think things over.”

Garbage - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Shirley Manson (Vocalist), Garbage |
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

Perhaps the most poignant messages of the night came after Garbage returned for their encore. “No life is very easy,” Manson told concertgoers. “Remember that today’s just a day. Tomorrow will be better. And if tomorrow isn’t better, maybe the day after that might be,” Manson said before dedicating “The Trick Is to Keep Breathing” to any fans who might be struggling.

They followed it with one of the band’s latest singles, “No Horses,” which Manson took some time to speak about.

We must focus on the things that are precious. Not the things that are of the most financial value, but the things that are truly truly precious that make our world beautiful, that make us want to live, that make us want to breath and thrive. And this is what this song is about, Manson said.

It is about the fact that we must never fuck up our planet and our beasts and our animals and the things that don’t make money and that, above all else, human beings are our biggest and most important resource.

Garbage - Photo Credit: Rodrigo Izquierdo
Shirley Manson (Vocalist), Garbage |
Photography:
Rodrigo Izquierdo © All Rights Reserved

Garbage closed the show on a high note with “Cherry Lips (Go Baby Go),” a song that Manson called their ode to the LGBQT community, which she has been a very vocal supporter of over the years.

It’s good to be free, and it’s good to be a nonconformist.
So this one goes out to you.

Photo Album

Photographer: Rodrigo Izquierdo

Garbage & Rituals Of Mine – Marquee Theatre 10-7-18

Flickr Album Gallery Powered By: WP Frank

Photography © Reagle Photography
All Rights Reserved